Health and Medicine

FSI’s researchers assess health and medicine through the lenses of economics, nutrition and politics. They’re studying and influencing public health policies of local and national governments and the roles that corporations and nongovernmental organizations play in providing health care around the world. Scholars look at how governance affects citizens’ health, how children’s health care access affects the aging process and how to improve children’s health in Guatemala and rural China. They want to know what it will take for people to cook more safely and breathe more easily in developing countries.

FSI professors investigate how lifestyles affect health. What good does gardening do for older Americans? What are the benefits of eating organic food or growing genetically modified rice in China? They study cost-effectiveness by examining programs like those aimed at preventing the spread of tuberculosis in Russian prisons. Policies that impact obesity and undernutrition are examined; as are the public health implications of limiting salt in processed foods and the role of smoking among men who work in Chinese factories. FSI health research looks at sweeping domestic policies like the Affordable Care Act and the role of foreign aid in affecting the price of HIV drugs in Africa.

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Jennifer Choo
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On May 26th, the Stanford China Program brought together an esteemed panel of public health experts, noted for their successful collaborations with institutions in China, from Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health; University of Michigan Medical School; and the Yale School of Public Health.  These scholars gathered together for a private virtual panel, titled “Healing Ties: Future Medical Collaborations between U.S. and China amidst COVID-19,” to comment upon how geopolitics is shaping their institutional cooperation with their counterparts in China.  They were asked by the host, China Program faculty member, Prof. Matthew Kohrman, to reflect upon optimal ways in which both countries’ scientific communities can deploy skills and strengths amidst tense intergovernmental ties; and the most advantageous path forward for health collaborations between the two countries.

Giving concrete examples from their own institutional experiences, these panelists came remarkably close to consensus in their main conclusions.  Three perspectives, in particular, stand out from their remarks.  First, all three presenters highlighted health science advances in China, especially since SARS, and that, as a consequence, scientists there are no longer inclined to present themselves as merely recipients of medical knowledge from the United States.  They expect to be equal partners in a two-way relationship.  U.S. and China, our panelists further explained, have therefore entered into a new and unfamiliar stage of defining a new equilibrium in their relations.  Secondly, all panelists described the need and challenges of conceptually separating government from scientist when fostering their U.S.-China collaborations.  Despite harsh rhetoric in the geopolitical sphere, these experts spoke of public health communities in China that still eagerly seek out and desire collaborative relationships with their counterparts in the U.S.  All emphasized the importance of personal relationships based on mutual respect and growing trust, built slowly and steadily over time, as having been critical for the success of their collaborative projects in China.

Perhaps most surprisingly, all three panel members expressed deep optimism for the future of U.S.-China health science exchanges.  Drawing from their own real-life experiences working closely with their Chinese counterparts, they acknowledged current political head winds. Yet, all three panel members agreed that public health collaboration can and ought to be a productive path forward for these two countries.  They expressed hope – increasingly rare in the Sino-U.S. geosphere these days – that working on issues like public health as much as climate change, which transcend borders, can generate concrete benefits that hold the promise of defusing political tensions and creating “healing ties.”

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Sponsored by the Stanford China Program and the Stanford Center at Peking University.

The ravages of COVID-19 are now global. But the pandemic first struck in China, and the nation suffered a 6.8% decline in its first-quarter GDP. China is also the first country to move towards a recovery, however, rolling out government measures, re-opening businesses, and re-starting its economy. In this key moment, the Stanford China Program, in collaboration with alumni members of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, surveyed senior executives in China as their companies reboot their operations. In this two-part program, we first unveil potential trends and key takeaways from the survey. In the second half, we host a panel of prominent CxOs from China who give their insights and experiences rebooting their businesses. What are short-term challenges that companies in China currently face? What are some long-term implications of COVID-19 for their operational model, supply chain strategies, technology, and business digitization? What might they also mean, if any, for global trade relations and the future of globalization?

Agenda (in Pacific Time)

5:00-5:30 PM   Survey Presentation: Key Takeaways
5:30-6:15 PM   China CxO Panel: Discussion
6:15-6:45 PM   Audience Q&A

Agenda (in China)

8:00-8:30 AM   Survey Presentation: Key Takeaways
8:30-9:15 AM   China CxO Panel: Discussion
9:15-9:45 AM   Audience Q&A

 

PANEL SPEAKERS

Portrait of Shiqi WangAlvin Shiqi Wang (王世琪) has served as CEO and President of 21Vianet Group, Inc. since February 2018. Currently, Mr. Wang serves as Vice President of TUS Digital Group, a subsidiary of TUS Holdings, and serves on the board of directors of Beijing CIC Technology Co., Ltd. and Guangzhou Tuwei Technology Co., Ltd. . Mr. Wang has nearly 20 years of experience in the telecommunications industry, working at various renowned international companies, including 11 years with Ericsson, focusing primarily on strategy development and execution, corporate management, and equity investments. Mr. Wang received a bachelor's degree from Tsinghua University and an MBA from Peking University-Vlerick MBA Programme (BiMBA).

 

Portrait of Xiang WangXiang Wang (王翔) is President and Acting CFO of Xiaomi Corporation, responsible for platform functions and for assisting the CEO with Group operations. Mr. Wang joined Xiaomi Corporation in July 2015 served as its Senior Vice President and President for International Business, responsible for global expansion, IP strategy, and strategic partner relationship management. Mr. Wang has more than 20 years of experience in the semiconductor and communications fields, with great vision and comprehensive understanding of next-generation wireless communications. He has played an integral role in shaping Xiaomi’s international business operations including with respect to its intellectual property compliance, management and strategy throughout the world. In 2016, Mr. Wang put together an international team of sales and marketing teams to expand into more markets outside of China. Within just 3 years, he led his teams into over 90 markets. As of Q3 2019, Xiaomi’s international revenue accounted for 48.7% of its total revenue. Today, Xiaomi is ranked among top 5 smartphone brands in over 40 markets. Mr. Wang previously served as the Senior Vice President of Qualcomm and President of Qualcomm Greater China, leading the company’s business and operations in Greater China. Prior to that role, he was Vice President of Qualcomm CDMA Technology, responsible for Qualcomm chipset business and customer service in China. Under his leadership, Qualcomm rapidly extended and strengthened its partnerships with increasing numbers of Chinese manufacturing customers. Before joining Qualcomm, Mr. Wang held key positions in sales and marketing at internationally leading companies, including Motorola and Lucent/Agere. Mr. Wang earned his BSEE from Beijing Polytechnic University.

 

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Portrait of Simon Yang
Simon Yang (杨士宁) is the CEO of Yangtze Memory Technologies Co., Ltd. (YMTC), who brings YMTC to a new height in 3D NAND industry. As an experienced executive in the semiconductor industry for over 30 years, Dr. Yang served as the CEO of XMC, COO/CTO of SMIC, and CTO/SVP of Chartered Semiconductor (Now GlobalFoundries), in charge of fab operation and technical R&D. Before that, he was in the Portland Technology Development sector of Intel for more than 10 years, in which he led a series of technical R&D projects. Dr. Yang obtained a Bachelor’s Degree from Shanghai University of Science & Technology, and a Master’s Degree and a Doctoral Degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

 

Portrait of Zhiqiang (ZZ) ZhangZhiqiang (ZZ) Zhang (张志强) is President of ABB in China since October 2018. He has extensive management experience and a deep understanding of the Chinese market, developed during his career at several large global companies over the past three decades. He joined ABB from Sandvik where he was Asia- Pacific Regional Holding Officer and President of Sandvik China, and Member of Sandvik Group Executive Committee. Prior to that, he held leadership positions at several other companies, including Nokia Siemens Networks, where he was President of the Greater China Region, and Siemens VDO Automotive, China, where he was President and CEO. Mr. Zhang is Non-Executive Board member of Georg Fischer AG (Switzerland) and Daetwyler Holding AG (Switzerland). He holds a bachelor’s degree in electronic engineering from Beijing Jiaotong University, China, and a master’s degree in business administration from the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University in Canada.

 

 

SURVEY PRESENTERS

Jean C. OiJean C. Oi is the William Haas Professor of Chinese Politics in the Department of Political Science and a senior fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. She directs the China Program at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and is the Lee Shau Kee Director of the Stanford Center at Peking University. Professor Oi has published extensively on China’s reforms. Recent books include Zouping Revisited: Adaptive Governance in a Chinese County, coedited with Steven Goldstein (Stanford University Press, 2018), and Challenges in the Process of China’s Urbanization, coedited with Karen Eggleston and Yiming Wang (2017). Current research is on fiscal reform and local government debt, continuing SOE reforms, and the Belt and Road Initiative.

 

Photo of Christopher ThomasChristopher Thomas was most recently a partner with McKinsey & Company. He served as co-Managing Partner for the Firm’s Global Digital Strategy service line as well as its Global IoT service line; and as the leader of its Asia Semiconductor Practice. Prior to McKinsey, Mr. Thomas spent ten years at Intel. He was the General Manager of Intel China, with joint ownership for the region’s $5 billion-plus P&L. In this role, he grew revenues by more than 50% and oversaw China’s successful elevation from a sales unit to an independent regional P&L business reporting directly into headquarters. Mr. Thomas began his career as a private equity investor at The Blackstone Group in New York City. He is currently a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, China’s leading educational institution. He received an MBA from Stanford Business School, where he was an Arjay Miller scholar; a Master of Arts in Political Science from Stanford University; and a Bachelor of Science in Economics, summa cum laude, from the Wharton School.

 

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Portrait of Xander Wu
Xander Wu (吴雪) oversees industry development and builds partnerships with the world’s top cloud computing companies for China Mobile International (USA). He helps clients expand their global footprint and advises companies on best practices for digital transformation. Mr. Wu has 13 years' experience in the global 4G and 5G industry, with a track record of achieving a number of the world’s first milestones in 5G and several de-facto standards for 4G and data networks. Mr. Wu graduated from Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he researched digital transformation and advised startups in the energy sector. He serves as a mentor at several incubators such as Plug and Play, helping startups find the right product/market fit and tailor go-to-market strategy.

 

Via Zoom Webinar.
Register at: https://bit.ly/2U2r30q

Alvin Shiqi Wang (王世琪) <br>CEO, President of 21Vianet Group, Inc.<br><br>
Xiang Wang (王翔) <br>President of Xiaomi Corporation<br><br>
Simon Yang (杨士宁) <br>CEO of Yangtze Memory Technologies Co., Ltd. (YMTC)<br><br>
Zhiqiang (ZZ) Zhang (张志强) <br>President, ABB (China)<br><br>
Jean C. Oi <br>Director of Shorenstein APARC China Program; William Haas Professor of Chinese Politics, Stanford University<br><br>
Christopher Thomas <br>Visiting Professor, Tsinghua University<br><br>
Xander Wu (吴雪) <br>China Mobile International (USA)<br><br>
Panel Discussions
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The easy phases of China’s quest for wealth and power are over. After forty years, every one of a set of favorable conditions has diminished or vanished, and China’s future, neither inevitable nor immutable, will be shaped by the policy choices of party leaders facing at least eleven difficult challenges, including the novel coronavirus. 

See also https://aparc.fsi.stanford.edu/news/tom-fingar-and-jean-oi-preview-forthcoming-volume-fateful-decisions

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Explore our series of multimedia interviews and Q&As with the contributors to this volume: 


China's future will be determined by how its leaders manage its myriad interconnected challenges. In Fateful Decisions, leading experts from a wide range of disciplines eschew broad predictions of success or failure in favor of close analyses of today's most critical demographic, economic, social, political, and foreign policy challenges. They expertly outline the options and opportunity costs entailed, providing a cutting-edge analytic framework for understanding the decisions that will determine China's trajectory.

Xi Jinping has articulated ambitious goals, such as the Belt and Road Initiative and massive urbanization projects, but few priorities or policies to achieve them. These goals have thrown into relief the crises facing China as the economy slows and the population ages while the demand for and costs of education, healthcare, elder care, and other social benefits are increasing. Global ambitions and a more assertive military also compete for funding and policy priority. These challenges are compounded by the size of China's population, outdated institutions, and the reluctance of powerful elites to make reforms that might threaten their positions, prerogatives, and Communist Party legitimacy. In this volume, individual chapters provide in-depth analyses of key policies relating to these challenges. Contributors illuminate what is at stake, possible choices, and subsequent outcomes. This volume equips readers with everything they need to understand these complex developments in context.

Available May 2020.

This book is part of the Stanford University Press series, "Studies of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center"

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Professor Luis de Lecea, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical and Translational Neurosciences Incubator), an SCPKU Faculty Fellow, organized a workshop on Sleep Regulation and Circadian Rhythms from Sept. 13-14 at SCPKU.

As many as 1/3 of adults experience serious sleep problems in their lifetime, yet the tools to treat sleep disorders have not increased significantly in the last 30 years. The last decade has seen unprecedented progress in basic science of sleep and China has generated an impressive number of publications at the forefront of this research area.  Prof. de Lecea and Dr. Wenjie Bian from Stanford convened a group of 13 researchers covering both basic and clinical aspects of sleep and circadian regulation.  Prof. Takeshi Sakurai from Tsukuba University and International Institute of Integrative Sleep Medicine delivered a keynote lecture on the neuronal circuitry of narcolepsy/cataplexy.  Dr. Zhian Hu from Chongqing Medical University showed evidence of a neuronal circuit controlling sleep and memory.  Dr. Zhili Huang from Fudan University showed recent data on the regulation of reward circuits by sleep. Dr. Xiao Bing Gao from Yale University provided evidence of the association between neuronal structures that regulate energy balance and sleep.  Dr. Wenjie Bian from Stanford presented his latest results on how sleep disruption during development affects social behavior in adults.  Dr. Qinhua Liu from NIBS in Beijing discussed his recent findings demonstrating a link between protein phosphorylation and sleep homeostasis.  Drs. Yun Kwok Wing from Hong Kong and Fang Han from the Peoples Hospital in Beijing and President of the Chinese Sleep Research Society presented clinical data on sleep disorders and narcolepsy.  The workshop was attended by ~20 students from PKU and other local institutions.  Participants concluded that this workshop was an innovative venue to discuss state of the art research and possible collaborations among researchers in the field of sleep neuroscience and medicine. 

 

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Ying Lu
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The 3rd Forum on Regulatory Science and Biomedical Innovations was successfully held on June 7-8th, 2019, at the Stanford Center at Peking University.

Initiated and organized by the Stanford Center for Innovative Study Design. The focus of this year’s forum is on the Real-World Evidence in Biomedical Product Development and Regulatory Science. About 150 international and Chinese scholars and researchers, US and Chinese regulators, and pharma/biotech leaders attended the event.

Over the last decade, significant strides have been made in medical research, which leads to great improvement in human health. With increasing availability of real-world data (RWD), such as electronic health and medical records and mobile health data, and rapidly evolving analytic techniques to generate real-world evidence (RWE) from the RWD, there are vast research interests in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies on how to use the RWE to inform regulatory decision and to assess the potential benefits and/or risks of medical products. On May 8, 2019, the US FDA published the draft guidance for industry on “Submitting Documents Using Real-World Data and Real-World Evidence to FDA for Drugs and Biologics.” On May 29, 2019, the Chinese National Medical Product Administration (NMPA) published their call for comments on the draft guidance on “Basic Considerations for Using Real-World Evidence to Support Drug Development.” Our forum was timely organized to discuss the challenges and research opportunities on the topic.

Three keynote speakers were invited, representing academia, government, and industry. Our first keynote speaker was Professor Ping-yan Chen, Chair of the Department of Biostatistics, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Professor Chen chaired development committee of tri-parties (Chinese academia, industry, and NMPA) for the Chinese draft of the guidance on RWE published on May 29, 2019. Professor Chen provided unique perspectives of their committee work and explained the considerations recommended in the guidance document. The second keynote speaker, Dr. Jing Chen, was from the Chinese NMPA on the evaluation of generic medications in China. The 3rd keynote speaker was Dr. Donald Yin, Vice President and Head of Economic and Data Science at Merck. He shared with us the examples and insights on the use of real-world data and evidence in the pharmaceutical industry.

Two invited panel discussions on “The Challenges and Opportunities for Using RWE in Medical Produce Development and Regulatory Oversights” and “Statistical Evidence on Regulatory Decisions” were also well received.

In addition, there were six invited scientific sessions on topics from the use of historical control data in confirmative trials, challenges in regulatory evaluation of generic drugs, diagnosis test and prediction models, Use of RWE for regulatory decisions, big data and artificial intelligence in precision health, and from the real work data to real world evidence.

Several feedbacks commented that this was the highest quality academic event in recent years.

The event was co-sponsored by the Stanford Center at Peking University and Peking University Health Science Center. The event was funded in part by mProbe and Merck.

 

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PKUHSC (Peking University Health Science Center) delegation, headed by Prof. Zhan Qimin, Executive Vice President of Peking University and President of Peking University Health Science Center, visited Stanford on May 9, 2019.

Prof. Oi, director of SCPKU (Stanford Center at Peking University) hosted the event for the delegation joined by interested Stanford faculty and researchers.

SCPKU was founded in 2012 with a landmark building on PKU campus.  Over 1000 programs and events have been convened at SCPKU, Stanford has had 78 projects in 40 different departments with some components involving research or training in China, and 3,187 different Chinese co-authors have collaborated on publications with Stanford authors.

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SCPKU has fellows across campus, with the greatest number of faculty from the School of Medicine.  SCPKU will expand Stanford’s role in global education and research and enable all faculty to do research in China.

The PKUHSC delegation presented an overview of PKU Health Science Center, which gave exposure to the Stanford participants for matching their own work with the resources that PKU offered.

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A roundtable introduction/discussion followed Prof Oi’s talk between the members of the delegation and Stanford participants.  Both sides were interested in exploring further partnership in global health, life science, public health and emergency medicine.

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The delegation had a meeting with Dean of the School of Medicine, Lloyd Minor (5th from right); Mijiza Sanchez (4th from right), associate Dean, office of Medical Student Affairs.

The delegation also met with Prof. Mark Cullen (4th from right), Director, Center for Population Health Sciences, Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research, Professor of Medicine, and discussed medical research and population health sciences.

Both sides agreed that a lot more could be done via the SCPKU platform in further exchange and exploration to formulate meaningful collaboration projects.

Stanford participants:   Jean Oi, director of SCPKU; Ann Hsing, research professor of medicine and a co-leader of the Population Sciences Program; Bruce Ling, professor of surgery; Hua Shan, professor of pathology; Jianghong Rao, professor of radiology; Karen Eggleston, senior fellow at FSI; Mathew Strehlow, professor of emergency medicine; Yang Hu, professor of Ophthalmology and Ying Lu, professor of biomedical data science.   PKU delegation members:  Qimin Zhan, executive vice president and president of Peking University Health Science Center; Weimin Wang, vice president of education; Ning Zhang, vice president of research; Jie Qiao, president, Peking University Third Hospital and director of National Clinical Research Center; Xiaojun Huang, director, institute of hematology; Qiudan Sun, director, office of International Cooperation of Peking University Health Science Center.

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Abstracts
Healthy Aging in Asia book.  Comparative Diabetics project, China and India
Karen Eggleston, Stanford University
How are health systems in Asia promoting evidence-based policies for healthy aging? What strategies have been tried to prevent non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs), screen for early detection, raise quality of care, improve medication adherence, reduce unnecessary hospitalizations and increase “value for money” in health spending?
The chapters of this book contribute to the literature on how diverse economies of Asia are preparing for older population age structures and transforming health systems to support patients who will live with chronic disease for decades. Fifteen concise chapters cover multiple aspects of policy initiatives for healthy aging and economic research on diabetes and hypertension control in health systems as diverse as cities such as Singapore and Hong Kong to large economies such as Japan, India, and China. Topics include precision health and personalized medicine in Japan; China’s evolving family doctor system and its national demonstration areas for chronic disease control; cancer disparities and public- private roles in Taiwan; and policies for healthy aging in Korea and India. Several chapters draw on research led by the Stanford Asia Health Policy Program on the net value of chronic disease management programs throughout Asia, starting with analysis of detailed longitudinal, patient-level data on diabetes management as a lens for understanding the net value of medical spending for patients with complicated chronic diseases across diverse health systems.


Research on Avoidable Admission of Diabetes Based on the Qualitative and Quantitative Transformation Model
Qin Jiang, China National Health Development Research Center


How does the Rural-Oriented Tuition-Waived Medical Education Programme Work? Evidence from Shaanxi, China
Jinlin Liu, Xi’an Jiatong University
Background: Attracting and recruiting health workers to work in rural areas is still a great challenge in China. The rural-oriented tuition-waived medical education (RTME) programme has been initiated and implemented in China since 2010, which aims to enroll the medical students mainly from rural areas to work in township hospitals for 6 years after they graduate. Taking Shaanxi as an example, this study aims to examine the effect of the RTME programme on rural-oriented tuition-waived medical students’ (RTMSs) attitudes towards working in rural areas.
Methods: Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2015 and 2019. The first questionnaire survey in 2015 was conducted among RTMSs from the first group of students enrolled in the RTME programme in Shaanxi. The second survey was key informant interviews which include government personnel, township hospital directors, and two RTMSs working in township hospitals. Quantitative and qualitative analysis methods were used.
Results: All the RTMSs of the first group have broken the initial contracts they signed when they were enrolled in 2010, which is basically consistent with the results of the first questionnaire survey in 2015. Of the 230 valid responses in the 2015 survey, 92.6% expressed their intentions of breaking the contract for working in rural township hospitals for 6 years after their graduation. Meanwhile, after the contract expired, only 1.3% intended to remain in the rural areas, 66.5% had no intention of remaining, and 32.2% were unsure. The factors related to a positive attitude among the RTMSs towards working in rural areas (no intention of breaking the contract) included being female, having a mother educated at the level of primary school or below, having a good understanding of the policy, having a good cognition of the value of rural medical work, and being satisfied with the policy. The factors related to a positive attitude of the RTMSs towards remaining in rural areas included being female, having a rural origin, having no regular family monthly income, having a father whose occupation was farmer, having a mother educated at the level of postsecondary or above, having the RTMSs be the final arbiter of the policy choice, having a good understanding of the policy, having a good cognition of the value of rural medical work, and being satisfied with the educational scheme.
Conclusions: Related policy makers and health workforce managers may benefit from the findings of this study. Appropriate strategies should be implemented to stimulate the RTMSs’ intrinsic motivation and improve their willingness to work in rural areas and to better achieve the objectives of RTME policy. Meanwhile, measures to increase the retention of RTMSs should also be advanced.

Changes in Sleep Duration Associated with Retirement Transitions: the Role of Nap
Rize Jing and Hai Fang, Peking University
In this study, we analyzed the impact of retirement on sleep duration for old people and this is a very interesting study for the aging population in China.

Study on the Influence Factors of the Disability Evolution and Status Duration of the Rural Elderly in China
Weihong Zeng, Xi’an Jiatong University
With the development of aging and urbanization in China, social security problem for elderly people in rural areas is becoming more and more prominent. The rural elderly disabled population increase along with the deepening of the degree of disability. It is necessary to research on the characteristics of the disability trajectory and the duration of the specific level of disability status for rural elderly, in order to establish the effective long term care policy system. Using a 6-wave longitudinal survey data from 2001-2015 “Survey on the Welfare of Elderly in Anhui Province, China”, this paper analyzed the disability trajectory and the duration of the different levels of disability status for rural elderly, meanwhile, explored influence factors for the trajectory and duration time. Finally, the policy suggestions were provided based on the study findings.

Utilization of Mixed Method to Evaluate the Impact of National NCD Demonstration Site in China
Juan Zhang, School of Public Health, Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) & China Academy of Medical Science
Background By the end of 2014, 265 districts/counties out of 2853 districts/counties across China has been nominated as National Demonstration Site or Shifanqu. We aimed to evaluate the implementation and impact of National NCD Demonstration Site.
Methods We utilized both sociological and epidemiological methods to collect both qualitative and quantitative data in November and December of 2016 for process evaluation and outcome evaluation. In the meantime, case study was conducted. Semi-structured interview and focus group was organized to collect the process of intervention activities, involvement of non-health sectors, and leadership of local government. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 4,000 adults aged 18 and above residing in 10 Shifanqu out of 265 across China. Demographic information, participation and attitudes toward intervention activities, awareness and lifestyle-related NCD, early detection of Cancer, management of blood pressure and glucose were collected.
Results The 265 Shifanqu were well implemented to meet the requirement of accreditation, in particular, health education and health promotion, China Health Lifestyle for All initiative, surveillance and safeguard measures. A government-led and inter-section coordination and communication mechanism has been established, with more than 16 non-health departments actively involved in the implementation. About 28.7% of residents living in the National Demonstration Area for comprehensive prevention and control of non-communicable disease were aware of the key messages related to chronic disease, 72.1% consumed vegetables every day, 53.6% consumed fruits every day, and 86.9% walked at least 10 minutes per day. Over 70% of patients with hypertension or diabetes reported that they were managed by the Community Health Centers, and above 50% of them were managed by the Community Health Centers as the national policy required.
Conclusion The implementation of National Demonstration Site has become a platform for the control and prevention of non-communicable diseases locally, and can be an important carrier of chronic disease prevention and control in China.


Initiatives on Hypertension Control in Shandong Province
Wang Yan, Shandong Provincial Health Department, P.R.China
As a province with a population of 100 million in North China, Shandong province has a relatively high prevalence of hypertension and its complications. The prevalence rate of hypertension among people aged between 18 and 69 is 23%. There are 16.5 million patients with diagnosed hypertension. There are 560,000 new cases of STEMI and stroke every year. Over the past decade, in order to control hypertension, Shandong province has implemented a series of intervention measures, including promoting salt reduction and blood pressure self-tests, providing free or low-price essential drugs such as anti-hypertensives, and implementing programs for early screening of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, among other initiatives. Most of these efforts appear to have achieved their intended effects, but there is still room for improvement in hypertension prevention and control. Building on the basis of this previous work, Shandong province will launch new targeted policies and measures aiming to promote blood pressure control among the population through lifestyle management and standardized drug treatment.

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斯坦福大学创新设计研究中心将于 2019 6 6 日至 8 日在北京大学斯坦福中心 (Stanford Center at Peking University)举办“监管科学与生物医学创新论坛”。 该论坛是一个 高端的国际讨论会议,今年的主题是 如何更好的使用真实世界证据对监管决策形成帮助,找 出医学创新产品的安全性和有效性评价中的挑战以及达成需要优先研究的一些共识,同时探索 政府监管部门、大学研究机构、工业界共同合作以应对这些挑战的机制。

Over the last decade, significant strides have been made in medical research, which leads to great improvement in human health. During this period, Chinese government has made important progress in promoting and managing medical innovations. Chinese FDA is now a formal agency member of the international council for harmonisation of technical requirements for pharmaceuticals for human use (ICH). With further integration of China into the global pharmaceutical research and development, how government regulatory agencies, the related law and regulations can promote industry innovation, while enhance their accountability and responsibility remains an important question. This forum is organized to address this need.

This forum provides a platform for high-level discussions on this topic by Chinese and US scholars from academia, experts from the Chinese Food and Drug Administrations, and R&D experts from biomedical industries. On June 7-8, 2019, the forum will host keynote speech sessions, invited talks, and panel discussion sessions. With collaborations from Chinese evidence based medicine association, we will discuss methods and policy related to monitoring drug safety, novel clinical trial design, and applications of modern statistical, AI and machine learning methods in drug development. On June 6, 2019, a one-day short course will be offered on "Statistical Methods for Medical Product Safety Evaluation."

Through this brainstorming and exchange, we want to identify research priorities and collaborative mechanisms for international scholars from academia, regulatory agencies and industry working together to promote biomedical innovations in an efficient and orderly manner.

 

 

SCPKU 

Yiheyuan Road No. 5, Beijing, China

 

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