Stanford - PKU Joint Courses

SCPKU

Stanford - PKU Joint Courses

Like other nations, China and the United States must address a number of complex and consequential transnational challenges. None of these challenges can be managed by China or the United States alone and none can be managed successfully with at least some level of US-China cooperation.

    About
  • About
  • Course Syllabus (Draft)
  • Schedule

About

EASTASN 285: American and Chinese Approaches to Managing Global Challenges (INTLPOL 285)

Like other nations, China and the United States must address a number of complex and consequential transnational challenges including climate change related threats to food and water security, nuclear proliferation, and the absence of institutions to manage cyberspace. None of these challenges can be managed by China or the United States alone and none can be managed successfully with at least some level of US-China cooperation. This unique course will be taught jointly by faculty from Stanford and Peking University and is open to students from both schools. The course will examine American and Chinese perceptions of and approaches to managing a number of different transnational challenges with the goal of identifying obstacles to and opportunities for cooperation. The lead instructors are Thomas Fingar (Stanford) and Wang Yong (Peking University).  This is a 2-unit course offered on a Credit/No Credit basis.  There will be one required paper at the end of the course.

 

Course Syllabus (Draft)

Week 1 (Mar 31)    Introduction:  US-China Relations and Global Challenges .    Tom Fingar and Jia Qingguo

Readings:  Atlantic Council, “China-US Cooperation: Key to the Global Future” Fingar, “Same Bed, Different Dreams, Shared Destiny”  

Week 2 (Apr 07)    Opportunities for and Obstacles to Cooperation.   David Lampton and Yu Tiejun

Readings:  Lampton, “Decoupling or Self-Reliance in US-China Relations are Dangerous Delusions” 

Week 3 (Apr 14)    Approaches to Managing Global Challenges.   Tom Fingar and Fan Shiming

Readings:  National Intelligence Council, Global Trends: Paradox of Progress (2017), pp. 45-69 

Week 4 (Apr 21)    Climate Change:  Water and Food Security.   David Lobell and Zhang Haibing

Readings:  National Intelligence Council, Water Insecurity Threatening Global Economic Growth, Political Stability (2020) 

Week 5 (Apr 28)    Activities in Cyberspace.   Andy Grotto and Qi Haotian

Readings:  Nakasone and Shulmeyer, “How to Compete in Cyberspace” (2020) 

Week 6 (May 05)    Terrorism and Regional Instability.   Joe Felter and Lei Shaohua

Readings:  Department of State, “Country Reports on Terrorism 2019,” Foreword 

Week 7 (May 12)    Nuclear Proliferation.    Scott Sagan and Han Hua

Readings:  Sagan, “Why do States Build Nuclear Weapons?” Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons 

Week 8 (May 19)    Security Dilemmas and Arms Races.   Rose Gottemoeller and Wang Dong

Readings:  Gottemoeller, “US-Russian Nuclear Arms Control Negotiations—A Short History (2020) Mastro, “The United States Must Avoid a Nuclear Arms Race with China” (2020) 

Week 9 (May 26)    Reforming International Organizations.   Steve Stedman and Zha Dongjiong             

Readings:  TBD 

Week 10 (Jun 2)    Possibilities for Cooperation.  

David Lampton/Tom Fingar and Wang Yong Readings: Slaughter and LaForge, “Opening Up the Order” (2021)  

Schedule

Quarter 2020-2021 Spring

March 31 - June 2, 2021

Wednesday:  7:10 - 9:00 pm PST